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DropMoss

A networked moss culture designed for standard T-bar drop-ceilings.

X-Stock is a concept for a line of clothing that uses the “deadstock” or “new old stock” of a Fifth Avenue luxury clothing brand. New but old, beautiful but hidden, these stockpiled clothes sit, wait and accumulate. While the deadstock problem is symptomatic of the retail industry as a whole, for a luxury brand the usual solution of a sale, or deep discount runs counter to its exclusivity. The clothes are consequently locked up.

In seeking a solution, the project moves beyond recycling to frame itself within the economic and ecological value of upcycling. The project attempts to engage the problematic stock not simply as surplus fabric to be sorted cut and redeployed. Rather, it enacts a specific transformation of the old stock – one that creates a dialog, or collaboration between the garment’s past and its future. 

The garment’s complex embodied history – evident in the brand’s commitment to Eastern aesthetics and material quality -- is hybridized with new uses and functions. Pockets, collars, button stands, and sleeves, migrate between pieces; new materials are integrated; seams exposed; all to enable new levels of programmatic, material and cultural performance while maintaining a sensitive dependence on the initial form of each garment.

Each piece shown here has been bred -- mixed with new traits and strains of clothing borrowed at times from sports and safety gear – offering in turn a greater intensity of relations between our bodies and the contemporary urban world. The pieces are raw, brutal in their mixtures, and show unabashed evidence of their manipulation through the process of unstitching and re-stitching.
X-Stock

X-Stock is a concept for a line of clothing that uses the “deadstock” or “new old stock” of a Fifth Avenue luxury clothing brand.

2012 -

The design emerges from the need to preserve the front, the visible streetscape -- while the back is freed of those constraints. The house is split in two, maintaining a Victorian half, and inserting a house in the back that addresses a more contemporary lifestyle. One house with two lifestyles.

The south facing (contemporary) front is articulated differently along the three levels. While the glazing is aligned on the top two levels, the skin of the building moves forward on the third level creating shade for both. Like a football player, or Bedouins in the desert, the black liner acts as “Kohl” or black eyeliner; the material helps to dampen glare, while taking advantage of the southern orientation for needed heat. On the second level the glazing is flush with the exterior, however with the lowering of the lid, the interior space gains privacy. The cut, or the open space between the two houses, allows maximum cross ventilation for both houses. It also provides light to the deep floorplate.
Janus House

Located in a historic preservation neighborhood, the design addresses a double condition.

2012

The Hu-mannequin project was initially conceived as a pop-up store proposal for a fashion designer. The proposal attempts to enrich the experience of viewing by engaging the olfactory sense. 

The installation is composed of scent-emitting mannequins that release a variety of smells into the environment throughout the day. Seats are placed within
the store to harness the scent of sitting individuals. The scent of those occupying the seats is transported through a system of ducts, where the smell is released into the air via perforated mannequins. The person occupying the seat metaphysically wears the clothing through smell. The mannequin, typically a lifeless object, is now animated by human qualities through the production of smells – becoming a Hu-mannequin.

While sitting on the furniture, a person literally inhabits the clothing, giving an outfit that person’s unique smell. This sets up a new dynamic. Unlike the act of physically trying on a suit in a dressing room, partners, friends, and strangers can visualise an outfit by smelling the virtual wearer’s body on the clothing.
The Hu-Mannequin

A human scent emitting mannequin.

2012

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IM Blanky

IM Blanky is a blanket with an IP address. The basic v. 1.0 is self-modeling. It is wirelessly linked to a digital model that registers and reprocesses its changing state in real time.

2011

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RAD

Research lab at the University of Toronto founded by NMO partner.

2011 -

The Farnsworth Curtain takes its cue from Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House. The famous glass house made its inhabitant uneasy by its complete transparency to the outside. Perimeter curtains were hung to provide opacity and psychological comfort.

Developed as a proposal within the Interior Design Show floor, the curtain carves out a curvilinear space which allows for both open and more intimate spaces. The curtain forms an enclosure yet allows the outside to register itself on its interior surface. Through a grid of infrared sensors and LEDs, objects and bodies on the exterior of the curtain appear as shadows on the curtain’s interior surface -- creating transparency through electronic mediation. The space within is differentiated further by dampening all sound. The enclosed space then becomes a sensory refuge from the bustle of the main floor, while still maintaining contact.
Farnsworth Curtain

The Farnsworth Curtain takes its cue from Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House. The glass house made its inhabitant uneasy by its complete transparency to the outside. Perimeter curtains were hung to provide opacity and psychological comfort.

2011

Through the use of solar panels on one side and LED lights on the other, an opaque wall becomes digitally transparent. 

The Farnsworth Wall takes its cue from Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House. The famous glass house made its inhabitants uneasy with its complete transparency to the outside. Perimeter curtains were hung to provide opacity and psychological comfort. With the Farnsworth Wall, the
outside becomes a dynamic digital wallpaper allowing one to see the outside without the outside seeing in.

The wall consists of a modular panelling system built as a Structural Insulated Panel (SIP) in a standard 1.2 m by 2.40m size. This module can be cut and applied to virtually any existing or new construction. A layer of solar panels on the exterior of the module harvests and stores radiant energy, while an embedded system of low-energy LED lights on the other side illuminates the interior space.
Farnsworth Wall

The Farnsworth Wall is an architectural wall module that harvests solar energy to illuminate the interior.

2009

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Out-House

The yard becomes an organic machine for the harvesting and filtration of a single body of water that is perpetually recycled in a semi-closed system.

2009

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Dual State Room

A space that responds to fluctuating light levels by continuously modulating its surface to enhance light and mood.

2008

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RGB Garden

Gardens, with their devotion to the sensual pleasures of the body have always been extra-ordinary sites, releasing us from our normative/ordinary routines though the artificial enhancement of natural phenomena. In this post-nature garden, a bio-machine supports and delights us.

2009

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The Circle

Skate Shop

2006

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Domestic Appendix
By distributing the previously centralized HVAC system into the
glazing system, glass becomes a haptic transmitter. With Valentina Mele
Heating and Cooling Glass

By distributing the HVAC system into the glazing system, glass becomes a haptic transmitter.
2011, with Valenina Mele

The Fresh -Air-Window employs two back-to-back Central Processing Unit cooling sinks. This configuration creates an instant Heat Recovery Ventilator
Fresh Air Window

2011, with Valentina Mele
A sealed glazed curtain wall module is capable of supplying fresh air.

MEKA logo forms
Meka World

Modular Housing

NMO on tumblr
NMO on Tumblr

An NMO image blog

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Walsall

In order to create a necessary densification/intensification of activities within the boundaries of the site, all form is programmed not just once… but twice.

2009

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Digital Window

2007

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Calculating Wall

2004

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Khyber Ridge House

Being commissioned by a professional snowboarder, the strategy takes its cue from the intimate engagement of a shredder following the line of a mountain; it is one of maximum engagement with the site.

2005

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San Jose

2005

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Octavia Blvd.

2005

NMinusOne Unedited
NMO Unedited

Un-Edited, Un-Curated, Un-Rated, Un-Ruly

The roof is covered by 2.50cm of water, making the pool, hot tub and roof  into a single reflective surface. The sky and its reflection in the water merge seamlessly. People walking on the roof deack appear to be floating in space.
Sky House

The Sky House achieves one of the oldest ambitions of architecture… to suspend the body in space.

2004

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Pill Color Manual

2003

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Previous (n-1) Site

2003

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Invisible House

In the Invisible House, lighting is the primary shaper of one’s spatial experience. The notion of the invisible is explored in a couple of different ways: on the one hand the extreme familiarity and homogeneity that renders things invisible and on the other, the literal white or black out.

2001 –

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Ecumenon

2000

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Gallery House

The Gallery House is inverted, in that every opening is a window onto its own domestic activities.

1999

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Mirror House

Behind the one-way mirror, harmless activities inevitably take on subversive implications.

1999

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Pool House

In the Pool House, the house has invaded the pool. The bedrooms inhabit the deep end.

1999

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Hoover House

1999

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Kyoto
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Post War Reconstruction of the Souks of Beirut

1994